Ultimate Boot CD

Ultimate Boot CD download for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

General information

  • Category: Other tools
  • Version: 5.3.8
  • Last update: Feb 9, 2019
  • OS: Windows, Mac, Linux
  • License: freeware

What is Ultimate Boot CD?

Ultimate Boot CD is the best solution you can think of when you need a platform to test, diagnose, repair the CPU, BIOS, HDD, or Memory. You can run all packed tools from one bootable CD or your USB memory stick.

Ultimate Boot CD offers a lot of great freeware and GPL software. You can find here a solution to check, edit, save, and restore BIOS settings. Test, benchmark, and provide detailed information about the installed CPU. Recover deleted files. Clone all data on the hard drive or manage partitions.

Available BIOS apps include tools like !BIOS, BIOS, CMOSPWD, KEYDisk, PC CMOS Cleaner, Q&D Vital Data Manager, and WipeCMOS. When you accidentally delete files you will find handy to try Q&D Unit/Track/Head/Sector, Offline NT Password & Registry Editor, PCLoginNow, PCRegEdit, PhotoRec or TestDisk.

The feature list doesn't end here. There are tools to securely wipe disk information like Active@KillDisk, CopyWipe, Darik's Boot and Nuke, Fujitsu Erase Utili, HDDErase and more. If required you can also use the best boot management tools including BOOTMGR, Boot Partition, EditBINI, GAG (Graphical Boot Manager), or Gujin.

Benchmark stability of your CPU with free CPUstress, CPUburn, CPUinfo or CPUID. This is only a small part of the tools available in UBCD. You can find all the software included on the official website.

UBCD 5 includes the Linux-based distro Parted Magic. This should be the method of choice when you need to resize/rescue partitions, access NTFS filesystems or work with USB storage devices. Moreover, the newest version supports both syslinux/isolinux and grub4dos. This helps to boot the app on any particular machine.

When you boot up from the CD, a text-based menu will be displayed, and you will be able to select the tool you want to run. The selected tool actually boots off a virtual floppy disk created in memory.